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Nine Uncanny Magazine Stories Are on the 2022 Locus Recommended Reading List and Locus Award Poll!

FABULOUS NEWS, SPACE UNICORNS! HAPPIEST OF DAYS!!! NINE Uncanny Magazine stories are on the prestigious 2022 Locus Recommended Reading List! WE ARE SO THRILLED! Congratulations to all of the authors!

Best Novelette:

If You Find Yourself Speaking to God, Address God with the Informal You” by John Chu
Your Eyes, My Beacon: Being an Account of Several Misadventures and How I Found My Way Home” by C.L. Clark
Two Hands, Wrapped in Gold” by S.B. Divya

Best Short Story:

The Calcified Heart of Saint Ignace Battiste” by Christopher Caldwell
The Goldfish Man” by Maureen McHugh
Rabbit Test” by Samantha Mills
Ribbons” by Natalia Theodoridou
This Village” by Eugenia Triantafyllou
The Coward Who Stole God’s Name” by John Wiswell

ALSO! Congratulations to Uncanny Magazine Nonfiction Editor Meg Elison! Her short story “Fifteen Minutes of Grace” is on the list!

This means you can vote for these stories in the 2023 Locus Poll and Survey which determines the Locus Awards! Voting is FREE TO ALL! Along with these stories, Uncanny Magazine is also eligible for a Locus Award in the Best Magazine or Fanzine category, and Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas are eligible in the Best Editor – Pro or Fan category! Vote for the things you liked, and you can even write in things that didn’t make the 2022 Locus Recommended Reading List! YOUR VOTE ALWAYS COUNTS!

And as long as you are in a voting mood, don’t forget to vote in the Uncanny Magazine Readers’ Favorite Stories Poll! It’s open until February 21, and the winning author gets a SNAZZY CERTIFICATE!

Shine on, Space Unicorns!

Uncanny Magazine Issue 50 Cover and Table of Contents!

Coming January 3rd, the DOUBLE-SIZED MILESTONE 50th issue of the Hugo Award-winning Uncanny Magazine!!

All of the content will be available in the eBook version on the day of release.

The free online content will be released in 2 stages- half on day of release and half on February 7.

Don’t forget eBook Subscriptions to Uncanny Magazine are available from Weightless Books, and you can support us on our Patreon!

Uncanny Magazine Issue 50 Table of Contents:

Cover:
Sharps and Soft by Galen Dara

Editorials:
“The Uncanny Valley” by Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas
“The Tired Body Problem” by Meg Elison

Fiction:
“Collaboration?” by Ken Liu and Caroline M. Yoachim (1/3)
“Cold Relations” by Mary Robinette Kowal (1/3)
“How to Raise a Kraken in Your Bathtub” by P. Djèlí Clark (1/3)
“Waystation City” by A. T. Greenblatt (1/3)
“Horsewoman” by A.M. Dellamonica (1/3)
“Flower, Daughter, Soil, Seed” by Eugenia Triantafyllou (1/3)

“One Man’s Treasure” by Sarah Pinsker (2/7)
“The Father Provincial of Mare Imbrium” by E. Lily Yu (2/7)
“Silver Necklace, Golden Ring” by Marie Brennan (2/7)
“Miz Boudreaux’s Last Ride” by Christopher Caldwell (2/7)
“Bad Doors” by John Wiswell (2/7)
“Prospect Heights” by Maureen McHugh (2/7)

Nonfiction:
“The Haunting of Her Body” by Elsa Sjunneson (1/3)
“Something in the Way: AI-Generated Images and the Real Killer” by John Picacio (1/3)
“What a Fourteenth Century Legal Case Can Teach Us about Storytelling” by Annalee Newitz (1/3)

“The Magic of the Right Story” by A. T. Greenblatt (2/7)
“The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm: Audio Writing” by Diana M. Pho (2/7)
“Building Better Worlds” by Javier Grillo-Marxuach (2/7)

Poetry:
“The Hole Thing” by Neil Gaiman (1/3)
“Love Poem: Phoenix” by Terese Mason Pierre (1/3)
“The Credo of Loplop” by Sonya Taaffe (1/3)
“Kannazuki, or the Godless Month” by Betsy Aoki (1/3)

“The Witch Makes Her To-Do List” by Theodora Goss (2/7)
“Temperance and The Devil, Reversed” by Ali Trotta (2/7)
“Driving Downtown” by Abu Bakr Sadiq (2/7)
“Hel on a Headland” by Elizabeth Bear (2/7)
“To Whomsoever Remains” by Brandon O’Brien (2/7)

Interviews:
Ken Liu and Caroline M. Yoachim interviewed by Tina Connolly (1/3)
Eugenia Triantafyllou interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (1/3)

E. Lily Yu interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (2/7)
Christopher Caldwell interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (2/7)

Podcasts:
Episode 50A
(January 3): Editors’ Introduction, “Cold Relations” by Mary Robinette Kowal, as read by Erika Ensign, “Love Poem: Phoenix” by Terese Mason Pierre, as read by Matt Peters, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing Mary Robinette Kowal.

Episode 50B (January 17): Editors’ Introduction, “How to Raise a Kraken in Your Bathtub” by P. Djèlí Clark, as read by Matt Peters, “Kannazuki, or the Godless Month” by Betsy Aoki, as read by Erika Ensign, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing P. Djèlí Clark.

Episode 50C (February 7): Editors’ Introduction, “One Man’s Treasure” by Sarah Pinsker, as read by Matt Peters, “The Witch Makes Her To-Do List” by Theodora Goss, as read by Erika Ensign, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing Sarah Pinsker.

Episode 50D (February 21): Editors’ Introduction, “Bad Doors” by John Wiswell, as read by Erika Ensign, “Driving Downtown” by Abu Bakr Sadiq, as read by Matt Peters, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing John Wiswell.

Until Next Time, Space Unicorns! By Chimedum Ohaegbu

Hello—and goodbye—wonderful Space Unicorns! I’m writing to you because today, the second half of my last issue with Uncanny is out in the world at large. After over four years—or, accounting for the strange molasses-mire the pandemic made of time, I should say after a stack of strange epochs—I’m concluding my time as managing and poetry editor with Uncanny. Speaking as the poetry editor, this, Issue 49, is an incredible issue to end with, with a whole five poems in this issue. You’ll gain something permanent and surpassingly good in reading all these works: the artful ruminations of “A Dead, Divine Thing” by Eshqin Ahmad; the tenderness and formal experimentation of “Crossing” by Ewen Ma; the woven, playful righteousness of “Sang Kancil at the Protest” by May Chong; the quiet portraiture of “I Am a Little Hotel” by Ai Jiang; the narrativity and intergenerational considerations “A Testament of Bloom” by Taiwo Hassan. I’ve been lucky, I know, and I’m excited for everyone to get to read these poems—if you haven’t already!

As well, I’m so, so excited for new Managing Editor Monte Lin to take up the mantle. Monte actually co-managed this issue, and judging by how elegantly he maneuvered it—as well as his invaluable contributions over the length of his term as assistant editor—I know that his time as managing editor will be another shining chapter in Uncanny’s future. Please join me in congratulating him, as well as new assistant editor Tania Chen, whose enthusiasm and expertise will likewise push Uncanny to new, sterling heights.

It’s odd to be writing this post—I knew it was coming, knew when why and how, but it’s one thing to know something informationally and another to know it elsewise, in the chest and marrow. I’ve spent most of my adulthood so far with Uncanny: I was the magazine’s first intern, hired when I was 19, and progressed over the years to the assistant, then managing, then managing/poetry editor. I’ve arrived at the person I am now in large part because Lynne and Michael took that chance in bringing me onto Uncanny. I’ve been changed by all I’ve read and learned and given and gotten here—in ways I’m aware of and ways that I know I’m yet to discover.

But, concretely: Uncanny has led me to conventions and groupchats, to becoming more well-read and kinder of heart; it’s been the driving force of my career in the arts. I’ve been mentored to the moon and back—by, honestly, the whole team, but especially Lynne and Michael and previous managing editor, Michi Trota—and gotten to do some of the same. I learned how to use InDesign!—or rather, I wrestled it to an uneasy truce, which I’ll count as victory.

And I became the first known Black woman to win a best semiprozine Hugo, something I don’t take lightly: note how late it happened, 2020! To be the first, which is not a position I mean to valorize, is an indictment of our genre. If I were to go into my thoughts on that I’d run out of pixels, but I’ll say this: it should have been sooner. So looking forward, it mustn’t be rare (and it’s already getting less and less rare, thankfully).

It’s strange to be leaving; I’ve said this already. It’s as true as it was, though—truer, as the Thomases are enduring a heartbreaking time after and during what’s been a prolonged struggle. It’s a testament to their dedication and love of the genre, of this community, that the magazine continues in its beauty, full steam ahead, supporting authors and artists at all stages of their careers. We’ve all been aware of my departure for a while, but it doesn’t change the fact that I’m leaving at a vulnerable time. The Thomases, the magazine, deserve your support. I know I’ll continue sending mine, even if in a different capacity.

And a word on capacities. It is true that I have, multiple times, imagined what my term as managing and poetry editor would have been like if it hadn’t coincided almost exactly with the pandemic. If I wasn’t, throughout, burnt out—at best—running on fumes—at best—simply put, not at my best. It’s not the most important thing the pandemic took, but it’s still something that prods my what if neurons almost daily, that parallel universe where things were just…easier. Still, the hardest years of my life comprised the back half of 2018 to, well, now—the pandemic of course worsened my state as it did for us all, but it was far from the originator of my recent years’ intense strife—and having meaningful work with people who cared so deeply was, is, something I needed more than I knew. I’m so glad to have been here. I’ve gotten such grace and patience, and that has been a gift beyond measure during this stormiest of seasons.

And I’m so thrilled about this issue! I’ve mentioned already the poetry, but please: seek out this issue’s fiction by Samantha Mills, Vivian Shaw, Matthew Olivas, Nina Kiriki Hoffman, Iori Kusano, Anya Ow, and Emily Y. Teng, and reprint by Catherynne M. Valente; linger in the nonfiction by Izzy Wasserstein, Jennifer Marie Brissett, Alex Jennings, and Karen Heuler; delve into the thoughtful editorials by Lynne and Michael, and nonfiction editorial by Meg Elison; gaze upon the spectacular cover art by Maxine Vee; wonder at the interviews by Caroline M. Yoachim; drink in the podcast by Erika Ensign and Steven Schapansky—and, when you’re done, add your name to our Patreon post by joining the Space Unicorn Ranger Corps 😊

This has already grown overlong, so I’ll be brief with regards to my future plans. (Also being brief because these plans are admittedly a little hazy.) At the moment, my post-Uncanny goals are to continue to revel in Uncanny’s future issues, albeit as a reader rather than editor; to get so! much! writing done—I’m working on a novel!; and, most crucially, to rest. I’m happy, no, excited, no, thrilled, to delete InDesign from my computer—I’ll use the driver space it frees up for a new videogame. I’m curious about the future, and thankful for the past, and in the present—well, I suppose thankful works here, too.

It’s been beautiful, Space Unicorns. Thank you, thank you, thank you: and see you soon!

Uncanny Magazine 2022 Award Eligibility

It’s the time of year when people post their year-in-reviews to remind voters for the different SF/F awards what’s out there that they might have missed, and in which categories those stories are eligible (especially for the Hugo Awards and Nebula Awards). 2022 was the eighth full year of Uncanny Magazine (Issues 44 through 49). We are extremely proud of the year we had.

This year, Uncanny Magazine is still eligible for the Best Semiprozine Hugo Award. Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas are also still eligible for the Best Editor (Short Form) Hugo Award for editing issues 44-49. (Note: If you are nominating the Thomases in this category, please continue to nominate them together. They are a co-editing team.)

The stories listed below are eligible in either the short story, novelette, or novella categories of the SF/F awards. If you are a SFWA member nominating for the Nebula Awards, you can find eBook copies of these stories in the SFWA Forums.

Please also note that essays are eligible for the Best Related Work Hugo Award, and poetry is eligible for the Rhysling Award. As Uncanny is a semiprozine, all of the essays and original art also contribute towards the creators’ Best Fan Writer and Best Fan Artist Hugo Award eligibility.

 

Novellas (17,500-39,999 Words):

Radcliffe Hall by Miyuki Jane Pinckard

 

Novelettes (7500-17,499 Words):

Your Eyes, My Beacon: Being an Account of Several Misadventures and How I Found My Way Home by C.L. Clark

Two Hands, Wrapped in Gold by S.B. Divya

If You Find Yourself Speaking to God, Address God with the Informal You by John Chu

The Prince of Salt and the Ocean’s Bargain by Natalia Theodoridou

 

Short Stories (Under 7500 Words):

Ribbons by Natalia Theodoridou

The Calcified Heart of Saint Ignace Battiste by Christopher Caldwell

The Night Dance by Leah Cypess

Lily, the Immortal by Kylie Lee Baker

The Haunting of Dr. Claudius Winterson by Sarah Monette

How to Safely Store Your Magical Artifacts After Saving the World by Tina Connolly

Hundred-Handed One by Wen-yi Lee

Boundless by Miyuki Jane Pinckard

The Goldfish Man by Maureen McHugh

Under Green by Richard Butner

The Kaleidoscopic Visitor by Shaoni C. White

Flowerkicker by Stephen Graham Jones

I Will Have This Diamond for a Heart by Carlos Hernandez

Requiem for a Dollface by Margaret Dunlap

The Path of Water by Emma Törzs

This Village by Eugenia Triantafyllou

The Eternal Cocktail Party of the Damned by Fonda Lee

Bones Are Stones for Building by Haralambi Markov

Spirit Folks by Maurice Broaddus and Rianna Butcher

The Coward Who Stole God’s Name by John Wiswell

Family Cooking by AnaMaria Curtis

Fate, Hope, Friendship, Foe by Marie Brennan

Blessed Are the Healers by K.S. Walker

At the Lighthouse Out by the Othersea by Juliet Kemp

Bramblewilde by Jordan Taylor

To Hunger, As with Perfect Faith by Radha Kai Zan

Our Love Against Us by DaVaun Sanders

The 207th Time I Went Back to March 9, 1980 by Beth Cato

Girl, Cat, Wolf, Moon by Rati Mehrotra

Towered by Tansy Rayner Roberts

As One Listens to the Rain by Andrea Chapela, translated by Emma Törzs

The Portal Keeper by Lavie Tidhar

Rabbit Test by Samantha Mills

Transference by Vivian Shaw

To Walk the River of Stars by Emily Y. Teng

The Other Side of Mictlān by Matthew Olivas

can i offer you a nice egg in this trying time by Iori Kusano

Earth Dragon, Turning by Anya Ow

Travelers’ Unrest by Nina Kiriki Hoffman

Uncanny Magazine Issue 49 Cover and Table of Contents!

Coming November 1st, the 49th issue of the Hugo Award-winning Uncanny Magazine!!

All of the content will be available in the eBook version on the day of release.

The free online content will be released in 2 stages- half on day of release and half on December 6.

Don’t forget eBook Subscriptions to Uncanny Magazine are available from Weightless Books and Amazon Kindle, and you can support us on our Patreon!

 

Uncanny Magazine Issue 49 Table of Contents:

Cover:
The Light Between the Sea by Maxine Vee

Editorials:
“The Uncanny Valley” by Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas
“The Horny Body Problem” by Meg Elison

Fiction:
“Rabbit Test” by Samantha Mills (11/1)
“Transference” by Vivian Shaw (11/1)
“The Other Side of Mictlān” by Matthew Olivas (11/1)

“Travelers’ Unrest” by Nina Kiriki Hoffman (12/6)
“can i offer you a nice egg in this trying time” by Iori Kusano (12/6)
“Earth Dragon, Turning” by Anya Ow (12/6)

“To Walk the River of Stars” by Emily Y. Teng (11/1)

Reprint:
“A Fall Counts Anywhere” by Catherynne M. Valente (12/6)

Nonfiction:
“The Necessity of Trans Joy” by Izzy Wasserstein (11/1)
“For Your Re-Consideration” by Jennifer Marie Brissett (11/1)

“Across the Afterverse: A Conversation with Afropunk SF/F Author Alex Smith” by Alex Jennings (12/6)
“What Do the Dying Know?” by Karen Heuler (12/6)

Poetry:
“A Dead, Divine Thing” by Eshqin Ahmad (11/1)
“Crossing” by Ewen Ma (11/1)

“Sang Kancil at the Protest” by May Chong (12/6)
“A Testament of Bloom” by Taiwo Hassan (12/6)
“I Am a Little Hotel” by Ai Jiang (12/6)

Interviews:
Vivian Shaw interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (11/1)

Iori Kusano interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (12/6)

Podcasts:
Episode 49A (November 1): Editors’ Introduction, “Rabbit Test” by Samantha Mills, as read by Erika Ensign “Crossing” by Ewen Ma, as read by Erika Ensign, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing Samantha Mills.

Episode 49B (December 6): Editors’ Introduction, “Travelers’ Unrest” by Nina Kiriki Hoffman, as read by Matt Peters, “A Testament of Bloom” by Taiwo Hassan, as read by Matt Peters, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing Nina Kiriki Hoffman.

Uncanny Magazine and Sarah Pinsker’s “Where Oaken Hearts Do Gather” Won Hugo Awards!

PHENOMENAL news, Space Unicorns! “Where Oaken Hearts Do Gather” by Sarah Pinsker won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story! Congratulations to Sarah!

Even more wonderful news! Uncanny Magazine (Publishers/Editors-in-Chief Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas, Poetry/Managing Editor Chimedum Ohaegbu, Nonfiction Editor Elsa Sjunneson, and Podcast Producers Erika Ensign and Steven Schapansky) won the Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine! THANK YOU, SPACE UNICORNS!!!

Once again, congratulations to the other five Uncanny Magazine stories that were finalists: “Colors of the Immortal Palette” by Caroline M. Yoachim for Best Novelette, “That Story Isn’t the Story ” by John Wiswell for Best Novelette, “Unseelie Brothers, Ltd.” by Fran Wilde for Best Novelette, “The Sin of America” by Catherynne M. Valente for Best Short Story, and “Proof by Induction” by José Pablo Iriarte for Best Short Story! Congratulations to everybody!

It was an amazing list of Hugo Award winners and finalists, many of whom are Uncanny authors and friends. CONGRATULATIONS TO EVERYBODY!!! Thank you to everyone who nominated these works, and to the hard-working Chicon 8 staff. We are honored, ecstatic, and overwhelmed.

#

Here is the text of the Editors-in-Chief Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas’s acceptance speech that was graciously read by Caroline M. Yoachim at the ceremony:

We (Michael, Lynne, and Caitlin) are currently a 19 minute walk north from this ballroom at Lurie Children’s Hospital. We don’t know what will be going on with Caitlin when you are hearing this, but she is getting the absolute best care possible. We planned to be there tonight with all of you, celebrating the fabulous works and people in Science Fiction and Fantasy literature and its Fandom. We really miss all of you, especially Caitlin’s SF/F aunts and uncles. You know who you are.

A couple of months ago, Uncanny Magazine published an essay by Gay Haldeman about the good things in Fandom. She ended it with a particularly moving passage about all of the fans who were there for her and her husband, Joe, when he became seriously ill and hospitalized while he was a guest at a con. She talked about the kindness and generosity of the fan community. That is our experience, too.

Every community has its issues, and we acknowledge there is always work to do to improve the SF/F community and make it as welcoming as possible. But we also don’t want to forget that when this community is at its best,  it’s filled with compassion, joy, imagination, friendship, and love. We’ve received a tremendous outpouring of support for Caitlin, and us, while she’s been battling her medical problems. Twitter and Facebook are filled with well wishes. Folks sent balloons and meal gift certificates. There is even a get well card for Caitlin in the exhibit hall.

Our hearts are filled with the deepest gratitude.

We are so very honored to win the Best Semiprozine Hugo Award. This was a fabulous group of finalists, filled with friends, colleagues, and people who inspired us as editors.

Uncanny Magazine is the work of numerous people, so we want to thank our 2021 staff of Managing/Poetry editor Chimedum Ohaegbu, Nonfiction Editor Elsa Sjunneson, Podcast Producers Erika Ensign and Steven Schapansky, Assistant Editor Naomi Day, Podcast Reader Matt Peters, Interviewer Caroline M. Yoachim, and all of our submissions editors. We also wish to thank the Chicon members; the Hugo Award staff, and of course our Ombudsman and world’s greatest daughter, Caitlin, who is the strongest, fiercest, most loving, and most amazing human we have ever known. And finally, a thank you to every single member of the Space Unicorn Ranger Corps.

We make Uncanny Magazine for all of you, you magnificent Space Unicorns. Thank you.

#

Here is the text of Managing/Poetry Editor Chimedum Ohaegbu’s acceptance speech that was graciously read by Caroline M. Yoachim at the ceremony:

We’re so thrilled to be honoured with this Hugo Award. This is my last year working with Uncanny, and though the work itself has been reward enough, I’m pleased and appreciative now more than ever to witness, not just today but over the past five years, the community’s  enthusiasm for our magazine, and for all the beautiful semiprozines nominated alongside us. Thank you!

#

Here is the text (with some additions) of Nonfiction Editor Elsa Sjunneson’s acceptance speech:

Thank you all so very much for this honor. I didn’t have my thoughts entirely collected when onstage, so I wanted to share my full thanks here.
I am so grateful to every author who worked with me at Uncanny Magazine as non-fiction editor. It was an honor. Thank you for telling the truth with me, it is always brave and challenging to do so.
I also owe an enormous debt of gratitude to my husband, Nate, who has supported me in every facet of my career. I’m so grateful to be married to a fellow writer, because it makes me better at what I do. I also want to thank every peer I have in the writing community for engaging with me in critical thought. It matters to an editorial vision.
I can’t go without acknowledging the ASL interpreters from the live event, who agreed to step up next to me. I wanted to show hearing people that seeing an interpreter did not change their experience of a live-streamed event – only that it equalized access for everyone who needed it, without hiding our needs away.
This was my last year at uncanny, and it was truly a joy to craft essays and editorials that supported the change of minds, and the development of dialogues.
Thank you, all.

Sarah Pinsker’s “Where Oaken Hearts Do Gather” Won the Eugie Foster Award!

Excellent news, Space Unicorns! Sarah Pinsker‘s  “Where Oaken Hearts Do Gather” won the Eugie Foster Memorial Award for Short Fiction! Congratulations to Sarah!!!

Congratulations also to Caroline M. Yoachim,  whose “Colors of the Immortal Palette” was also a finalist!

And congratulations to all of the other wonderful finalists!

From their website:

The Eugie Foster Memorial Award for Short Fiction (or Eugie Award) celebrates the best in innovative fiction. This annual award is presented at Dragon Con, the nation’s largest fan-run convention. Starting with the 2020, we will add a video presentation of the award online, along with a reading of a section of each finalist.

The Eugie Award honors stories that are irreplaceable, that inspire, enlighten, and entertain. We will be looking for stories that are beautiful, thoughtful, and passionate, and change us and the field. The recipient is a story that is unique and will become essential to speculative fiction readers.

Uncanny Magazine Issue 47 Cover and Table of Contents!

Coming July 5, the 47th issue of the Hugo Award-winning Uncanny Magazine!!

All of the content will be available in the eBook version on the day of release.

The free online content will be released in 2 stages- half on day of release and half on August 2.

Don’t forget eBook Subscriptions to Uncanny Magazine are available from Weightless Books and Amazon Kindle, and you can support us on our Patreon!

Uncanny Magazine Issue 47 Table of Contents:

Cover:
The Wizard of Light by Kirbi Fagan

Editorials:
“The Uncanny Valley” by Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas
“The Pregnant Body Problem” by Meg Elison

Fiction:
“Fate, Hope, Friendship, Foe” by Marie Brennan (7/5)
“Family Cooking” by AnaMaria Curtis (7/5)
“At the Lighthouse Out by the Othersea” by Juliet Kemp (7/5)
“Blessed Are the Healers” by K.S. Walker (7/5)

“If You Find Yourself Speaking to God, Address God with the Informal You” by John Chu (8/2)
“To Hunger, As with Perfect Faith” by Radha Kai Zan (8/2)
“Bramblewilde” by Jordan Taylor (8/2)

Reprint:
“The Hurt Pattern” by Tochi Onyebuchi (8/2)

Nonfiction:
“Finding My Way Back to Solitary Fandom” by Keidra Chaney (7/5)
“Wonderful Things I’ve Seen in Science Fiction Fandom” by Gay Haldeman (7/5)

“In Defense of the To Be Read Pile” by Jim C. Hines (8/2)
“She Is Sword, and She Is Sorcery: Womanhood in The Witcher and The Wheel of Time” by Jeannette Ng (8/2)

Poetry:
“Quiet and Fragile Try on the Same Romper” by Brandon O’Brien (7/5)
“Tuesday, Late Commute” by Sarah Grey (7/5)

“Sibylline” by Sonya Taaffe (8/2)
“Mirrors” by Millie Ho (8/2)

Interviews:
AnaMaria Curtis interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (7/5)

Jordan Taylor interviewed by Caroline M. Yoachim (8/2)

Podcasts:

Episode 47A (July 5): Editors’ Introduction, “Fate, Hope, Friendship, Foe” by Marie Brennan, as read by Erika Ensign, “Tuesday, Late Commute” by Sarah Grey. as read by Matt Peters, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing Marie Brennan.

Episode 47B (August 2): Editors’ Introduction, “If You Find Yourself Speaking to God, Address God with the Informal You” by John Chu, as read by Matt Peters, “Mirrors” by Millie Ho, as read by Erika Ensign, and Lynne M. Thomas interviewing John Chu.

Uncanny Is Once Again Seeking an Assistant Editor! Black, Indigenous, and People of Color HIGHLY Encouraged to Apply!

Space Unicorns! We’re seeking to fill the Assistant Editor position with Uncanny Magazine, and we STRONGLY encourage BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color) folks to apply! The position will begin in August 2022, and will run for six issues/a year with possibility for renewal. There is a modest stipend for this position.

We’re looking for someone with a deep love of science fiction and fantasy, and an interest in editorial work and publishing. The Assistant Editor position will allow opportunities to participate in the daily operations of running a multi-time Hugo Award-winning online bimonthly publication in the SF/F field. The Assistant Editor works closely with the Managing Editor, and the primary tasks of the Assistant Editor include:

  1. Newsletter: creating written content for the monthly Uncanny Magazine newsletter
  2. Copyediting: the Assistant Editor will help with copyediting for grammar, usage, spelling, punctuation, clarification of meaning, fact-checking, and checking for anachronistic language in all published pieces
  3. Social Media Promotion: posting promotional content to Instagram and Tumblr, and assisting the Editors with Twitter and Facebook content as needed
  4. Graphic creation/design: assisting the Managing Editor with creation of graphics images and ads as needed
  5. Other duties as assigned, not to exceed 10% of total time allotted

The Assistant Editor position will require roughly 15-20 hrs per month. It is not location-dependent; communication and tasks will be done primarily online via email, Slack, and Google Hangouts, or Zoom.

Prior experience in publishing and familiarity with using programs such as Google docs, Canva, Instagram, Tumblr, Tinyletter, and WordPress is beneficial but not required. Training on how to use these will happen in formal sessions, and informally on the job.

Applications for the Assistant Editor position will be open from Monday,  June 6 through Thursday,  June 16. Please submit a short personal statement (up to 450 words) via Uncanny’s contact form with “Uncanny Assistant Editor” in the subject line.

Good luck, Space Unicorns!

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